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Grieving daughter uses social media to raise awareness on 'huffi - KVOA | KVOA.com | Tucson, Arizona

Grieving daughter uses social media to raise awareness on 'huffing'

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TUCSON -

A grieving daughter is using her father’s tragic death to spread awareness about a deadly addiction, often fueled by items found in any household.

Tiffany Inman’s father, Gene, has been ‘huffing’ for the past ten years. ‘Huffing’ is a term often used to describe inhalant abuse, or the inhalation of chemicals in aerosol products to obtain a quick high.

“I didn't know about huffing until my dad,” she said. “I saw him do it one day and I said ‘what is this’? And he goes 'this is huffing'.”

The 50-year-old inhaled between 6-12 air dust cans a day. His addiction took a tragic toll on his body this month when he suffered multi-organ system failure.

“The oxygen ventilator [was] keeping him alive. He's not going to make it. He's not going to be around. It's really hard,” she said.

Millions of Americans admit to experimenting with huffing. Tiffany said some of her father’s doctors didn’t even know about the addiction.

That’s why she decided to take her tragedy to social media, and raise awareness about inhalant abuse. She filmed herself sitting next to her father’s hospital bed, and told his story.

“It’s an easy, over the counter something you can grab. Like air freshener,” she said. “Kids can steal it and parents not even know. More people need to be aware.”

The video has been viewed on social media more than 45,000 times.

“I was expecting just a few people to look at my video. I wasn't expecting over thirty thousand people to watch it," she said. “I want to say thank you to each and every one of them.”

Tiffany’s family came to the painful decision to take her father off of life support. The father-of-six passed away on Thursday, May 25.

She is hopeful her message will give some other family out there the second chance that hers didn’t get.

“My family tried to help impact my father's life. And it didn't work,” she said. “To know that I could maybe help someone else is a great feeling and that's all I want to do.”

For more information on inhalant abuse and warning signs to look out for, click here

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