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Why sharing this holiday season could save the world - KVOA | KVOA.com | Tucson, Arizona

Why sharing this holiday season could save the world

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TUCSON - Instead of buying gifts this holiday season, a local expert believes you should share goods and services.

According to Dr. Anita Bhappu, an associate professor of retailing and consumer sciences at the University of Arizona, the United States leaves the biggest consumer footprint in the world.

"As a world, we are using one and a half planets, which is not sustainable because we only have one planet . . .if everyone consumed like us in the U.S, we would need five planets of natural resources," said Dr. Bhappu.

Dr. Bhappu is encouraging "Don't buy, Share": a solution to this overconsumption. It entails reducing buying goods/services and, instead, participating in a  "sharing economy," where consumers access goods and services without owning them.

"We still have the opportunity to share our goods, but we no long do that," said Dr. Bhappu. "This is how we essentially managed as collectives to survive."

The University of Arizona's Confluencenter for Creative Inquiry is hosting a presentation by Dr. Bhappu on "Don't Buy, Share" on Thursday, November 12, at 6:00 p.m. at Playground Bar and Lounge. 

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