Border

Jun 9, 2014 7:56 PM by Nathan O'Neal

Hundreds of undocumented kids dropped off in Nogales straining resources

NOGALES, ARIZ. - Hundreds of undocumented children caught in Texas were transported to federal facilities in Arizona for processing which has produced a strain on resources.

The unaccompanied children are being bused to the U.S. Border Patrol Station in Nogales to relieve overflowing sites in South Texas.

Roughly 1,000 children - mostly from Central America - are housed in a converted warehouse as they wait to be processed by federal authorities.

The U.S. government is calling this a humanitarian crisis. Senior White House officials said that the reason for the influx of children from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala is because of the sheer amount of violence and unrest in their home countries.

With even more kids on the way, federal officials are scrambling to provide enough portable bathrooms, cots, water, food and even showers.

Santa Cruz Sheriff Tony Estrada said this is the first time his border community has ever had to deal with something like this.

"I've been in law enforcement here in the border community for 47 years and I've never seen anything like this of this magnitude," Cruz said.

While the federal government has sent some aid, Border Patrol agents are starting to feel the strain on their workload.

There are certain agents that we have working certain positions out in the field and you have to bring those agents from there and put them in a position to process these minors," said Art Del Cueto, a representative of the Border Patrol Union.

Some state lawmakers have managed to tour the detention center.

"They're in these conditions that really no kid should be in," said Arizona State Rep. Demion Clinco.

The Border Patrol detention center can hold up to 1,500 people and the children will receive both medical and legal aid before they are eventually released to a shelter within 72 hours of arrival.

"Without a parent or guardian being detained and then now being trapped in a system that is over-burdened that has really reached crisis level because there is really no other agency to take them... It is very, very sad," Clinco said.

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