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 UPDATE: 14 arrested after chaining themselves to trains

3 weeks ago

Protesters, rights groups contest LAPD arrests

LOS ANGELES (AP) - People arrested in Los Angeles during demonstrations over the Ferguson, Missouri police shooting are challenging the legality of their arrests, saying they were never warned to disperse before officers swooped in.

At a press conference Friday, one woman says she was arrested even though she'd only left her downtown apartment to watch a protest. Leigh Wiley says she told an officer she lived in the area but he claimed she was lying.

Erin Darling of National Lawyers Guild says his organization also is concerned about the way police arrested people en masse.

However, LAPD Commander Andrew Smith says the dispersal order was clear and those arrested failed to comply.

More than 300 people have been arrested in a week of mainly peaceful protests

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3 weeks ago

UPDATE: 14 arrested after chaining themselves to trains

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) - Authorities in the San Francisco Bay Area say 14 people have been arrested and all trains are running again after a group protesting the grand jury decision in Ferguson, Missouri, chained themselves to trains and interrupted service from Oakland to San Francisco.

Bay Area Rapid Transit system spokeswoman Alicia Trost says about 25 people chained themselves Friday and shut down a major station as demonstrations persisted days after jurors declined to indict a white officer in the shooting death of a black 18-year-old.

Trost says about 125 protesters wearing T-shirts reading "Black Lives Matter" gathered at the West Oakland station. She says police have cleared the station and service has restarted.

Oakland protesters have spent days rallying against the jury's decision Monday, some smashing windows of businesses and blocking freeways.

(PHOTO: NBC Bay Area)

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3 weeks ago

Oakland protesters arrested for halting trains

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) - Protesters tied to the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri have been arrested after they chained themselves to trains, halting service from Oakland to San Francisco and shutting down a major station in the Bay Area Rapid Transit system.

System-wide BART delays remain Friday afternoon, an agency spokeswoman said.

No injuries have been reported.

About 25 protesters Friday first held train doors open as demonstrations persisted four days after a grand jury declined to indict a white police officer in killing of a black 18-year-old.

They later chained themselves together and to the trains, stopping service and shutting down the West Oakland Station.

(PHOTO: NBC Bay Area)

3 weeks ago

Attorney: Darren Wilson to retire from Ferguson Police

(CNN)- Amid protests and anger over a grand jury's decision against indicting officer Darren Wilson for the shooting death of Michael Brown, word comes that Wilson may be retiring from the Ferguson Police force.

Wednesday night, one of Wilson's attorneys, Neil Bruntrager, spoke to CNN's Don Lemon.

He described the negotiations going on between Wilson and his soon to be former employer.

"There are discussions that are going forward with the department to separate from the department in an amicable fashion. We're talking about it. realistically Don, he can't go become to being a police officer, he knows that. There is no illusion about an of this, the way in which he leaves. That is really important to him on a lot of different levels, but, it's not a question of if, it's a question of when," said Bruntrager.

Wilson reportedly decided against resigning before the grand jury's decision. He felt that resigning while they were still hearing evidence would seem that he was admitting guilt.

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3 weeks ago

Dozens arrested on 'Much Better Night' in Ferguson, Missouri

At least 44 people were arrested as protests erupted in Ferguson, Missouri, for a second night over the Michael Brown case, police said early Wednesday.

Two guns and a Molotov cocktail were seized while rocks, broken tent poles and bottles were hurled at officers, according to St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar. Windows were broken at City Hall and tear gas was deployed nearby. However, there was no repeat of the widespread shooting, looting and arsons the wracked the St. Louis suburb overnight Monday.

"Generally it was a much better night," Belmar told a 2:30 a.m. ET news conference. Most of the arrests were for misdemeanors, he added. They included people residing in New York, Oklahoma and Georgia.

A grand jury's decision on Monday to not indict Officer Darren Wilson over the fatal shooting of the unarmed teen triggered violent protests. Protesters also torched a police car and smashed windows at businesses that hadn't already boarded up their storefronts late Tuesday.

Belmar said a car was set ablaze adjacent to the Michael Brown memorial and that firefighters didn't respond "due to sporadic gunfire in the area." Looters also targeted a Walgreens store.

Missouri State Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson said that many of the protesters "assisted us" late Tuesday but added that some people "bent on violence" hid themselves in the crowd.

He added: "None of us could've imagined that last night [Monday] would've been what it was. In the recent history of our country, we haven't seen anything like it."

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3 weeks ago

Protests postpone St. Louis Thanksgiving parade

ST. LOUIS (AP) - The annual Thanksgiving Day parade in St. Louis has been postponed because of the continued protests over Michael Brown's death and other fatal police shootings.

Parade organizers cite community unrest that erupted after the Monday night announcement of a St. Louis County grand jury's decision to not indict Ferguson officer Darren Wilson in Brown's death.

They hope to reschedule the event before Christmas.

Ferguson has been the site of the most intense protests, with another 45 people arrested Tuesday night. In St. Louis, hundreds of demonstrators disrupted downtown traffic Tuesday for several hours by blocking major intersections, an interstate highway and a Mississippi River bridge connecting the city to Illinois. St. Louis police made 13 protest-related arrests Tuesday.

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3 weeks ago

Aerial video of damage in Ferguson

Violent protests raged for hours Monday night after it was announced that a grand jury has chosen not to indict Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown.

Assistant Fire Chief Steve Fair with the Ferguson Fire Department said they found structure fires along the corridor of Florissant, West Florissant, and Halls Ferry roads.

"We have been fighting approximately 25 structure fires tonight, along with a car dealership where we lost 10 cars that were burned up," said Fair.

More: http://on.ksdk.com/1zpDlNx

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3 weeks ago

At least 14 injured in Ferguson-related protests

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) - Hospitals report having treated at least 14 people who were injured during the unrest that followed the announcement that a grand jury decided not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson for killing 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Several Ferguson businesses were damaged or destroyed by fires and others were looted during the protests that erupted after the Monday night announcement

Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis says it admitted two injured people and treated and released five others. It didn't disclose the nature of the injuries.

Christian Hospital, near Ferguson, says it treated six people for minor injuries. And Saint Louis University Hospital says it treated one person.

Wilson, who is white, shot and killed Brown, who was black and unarmed, on Aug. 9 during a scuffle in a Ferguson street.

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3 weeks ago

DEVELOPING: FERGUSON: Newly-released photos of Officer Darren Wilson gives a more detailed description on grand jury ruling

(CNN) -- A more-detailed description than we've ever had before emerges from a grand jury in Ferguson.

A wealth of evidence regarding the shooting death of Michael Brown has been released after the announcement that Officer Darren Wilson would not face criminal charges.

Amid chants of "no justice, no peace" over the last several months, a grand jury met 23 times starting in late August, eventually finding no probable cause to charge Officer Darren Wilson with a crime.

"Decisions on a matter as serious as charging an individual with a crime simply cannot be decided on anything less than a complete critical examination of all available evidence," said Robert McCulloch, St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney. "Anything less is not justice."

Newly-released photos of Wilson are part of the evidence made public after the decision. They show him in a medical examination, after he shot and killed unarmed teenager Michael Brown.

In his testimony to the grand jury, Wilson describes Brown punching him through the window of his patrol car.

"After he did that," Wilson says, "Next thing I remember is how do I get this guy away from me. What do I do to not to get beaten inside my car."

While most of the witnesses corroborated at least some sort of altercation at the car, the descriptions they gave of the shooting itself varied quite a bit.

McCulloch said, "Many of the same witnesses acknowledged that they didn't actually see the shooting. Some were running for cover, some were relating what they heard from others, or -- as I said -- what they assumed happened."

McCulloch said the grand jury couldn't rely solely on Wilson's testimony either.

"Like in any case, the target or the suspect is... has the most interest in the case," said McCulloch.

According to McCulloch, those witnesses whose stories stayed consistent, were consistent with each other and consistent with the physical evidence were all African American.

McCulloch says most of the witnesses agreed Brown was moving toward Wilson when the officer killed him, although one witness said Brown was standing still.

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3 weeks ago

DEVELOPING: Shots and fires in Ferguson

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) - Authorities say they heard hundreds of gunshots as Ferguson, Missouri erupted in protest following a grand jury decision not to indict a white police officer accused of killing an unarmed black 18-year-old.

The gunfire and chaos prevented firefighters from getting near flaming buildings and cars.

At least a dozen businesses were badly damaged or destroyed.

Thousands rallied peacefully in other U.S. cities.

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3 weeks ago

DEVELOPING: Grand jury considered testimony released in 1,000 pages of documents

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) - The grand jury deciding the Ferguson, Missouri police shooting case considered testimony released in more than 1,000 pages of documents.

Police Officer Darren Wilson testified that before he drew his gun on 18-year-old Michael Brown, Brown hit him in the face and tried to grab his gun.

Wilson testified that when he encountered Brown and a friend walking in the street, he noticed that Brown fit the description of a suspect who had just robbed a convenience store.

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3 weeks ago

DEVELOPING: Police: Ferguson protests worse than August

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) - The police chief in St. Louis County, Missouri says violent protests following the announcement that a white police officer would not be indicted in the shooting death of a black 18-year-old are "much worse" than protests that occurred right after the August shooting.

Following Monday night's announcement, at least a dozen businesses in Ferguson were looted and set on fire and protesters smashed windows out of police cars and buildings.

Officers lobbed tear gas to break up the crowds.

A Conoco gas station and several cars at a next door dealership, Auto Buy Credit, were set on fire.

Other details were not immediately known.

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3 weeks ago

DEVELOPING: Shots fired at NBC news crew covering Ferguson protest

(NBC) -- News crews from NBC and other outlets were fired upon by drive-by shooters while reporting from Ferguson Monday night.

NBC's Jay Gray was preparing to go live shortly before eleven central time when a volley of shots rang out about a block away.

The gunfire continued and got louder as the vehicle and gunmen approached.

Everyone quickly ducked inside a building.

The NBC crew set up by the door for its live report, but was then ordered inside by police.

No one was hurt.

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3 weeks ago

UPDATE: Thousands rally across US after Ferguson decision

UNDATED (AP) - Thousands of people are rallying across the country to protest a grand jury's decision not to indict a white police officer who killed an unarmed, black 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri.

Activists had been planning to protest even before the nighttime announcement that Officer Darren Wilson will not be charged in the shooting death of Michael Brown.

Police in several cities took precautions but report the demonstrations have been largely peaceful.

Protesters blocked an intersection in downtown, Oakland, California. Some carried signs that read "The People Say Guilty!"

In San Francisco, a few dozen people gathered in the Mission District chanting "No justice, no peace!" There were similar shouts in downtown Philadelphia. There was a small brief rally near the federal courthouse in Pittsburgh.

In Los Angeles, there was a protest at a park.

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3 weeks ago

DEVELOPING: Ferguson erupts from Grand Jury's decision

TUCSON - There will be no charges in Ferguson, Missouri, against a police officer who shot and killed an unarmed teen.

An estimated crowd of more than 500 were on the streets downtown awaiting the decision when the announcement was announced by St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch.

"No probable cause exists to file any charge against Officer Wilson and (the grand jury) returned a no true bill on each of the five indictments," said McCulloch.

Protesters on the streets first appeared stunned, then angered, as the grand jury's decision sunk in.

During the evening, shots were fired, windows smashed, tear gas launched and several buildings and cars were set on fire.

With the large police presence it appeared the force was controlling the situation early on but when fires erupted containment began slipping away.

Some of the burning buildings were local businesses still reeling from earlier unrest. A group attempted to tip over a police cruiser, but were unsuccessful as riot police moved in and dispersed the crowd.

Stay with News 4 Tucson as this story continues to develop on-line at KVOA.com. Tucson Today will have the latest in Ferguson beginning at 5 am.

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3 weeks ago

Brown family statement calls for peaceful protests

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) - Michael Brown's family issued this statement after a prosecutor announced that a grand jury has decided not to indict Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson:

We are profoundly disappointed that the killer of our child will not face the consequence of his actions.

While we understand that many others share our pain, we ask that you channel your frustration in ways that will make a positive change. We need to work together to fix the system that allowed this to happen.

Join with us in our campaign to ensure that every police officer working the streets in this country wears a body camera.

We respectfully ask that you please keep your protests peaceful. Answering violence with violence is not the appropriate reaction.

Let's not just make noise, let's make a difference.

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3 weeks ago

Obama to address Ferguson grand jury decision

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama will make a statement about a grand jury's decision not to indict the Ferguson police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown.

The White House says Obama will speak at 10 p.m. EST in the briefing room of the White House.

A grand jury decided not to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown. The fatal shooting of the unarmed, black 18-year-old sparked weeks of protests outside St. Louis.

The Justice Department is also conducting an investigation into possible civil rights violations that could result in federal charges.

Obama has previously called for protests to remain peaceful. He has said that the U.S. allows everyone to assemble peacefully and protest perceived injustices, but that there's no excuse for violence or breaking the law.

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3 weeks ago

Grand jury won't indict Ferguson cop in shooting

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) - A grand jury has decided not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown, the unarmed, black 18-year-old whose fatal shooting sparked weeks of sometimes-violent protests.

St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Bob McCulloch announced the decision Monday evening. A grand jury of nine whites and three blacks had been meeting weekly since Aug. 20 to consider evidence.

At least nine votes would have been required to indict Wilson.

The Justice Department is conducting an investigation into possible civil rights violations that could result in federal charges.

Brown's Aug. 9 death sparked more than a week of unrest that included angry clashes between police and protesters and led Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon to briefly summon the National Guard.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

A grand jury has reached a decision about whether to indict a Ferguson police officer in the shooting death of Michael Brown.

In a brief email to reporters, a spokesman for St. Louis County's top prosecutor said the decision would be announced at 8 p.m. at the downtown courthouse in the St. Louis County seat of Clayton. He offered no other details.

As the nation awaited the announcement, authorities quickly stepped up security around the courthouse. Barricades were erected, and more than 20 Missouri state troopers were seen silently assembling with rifles, 3-foot batons, riot shields and other equipment. Some nearby businesses boarded up their windows, just as many shops have already done near the site of Brown's death in Ferguson.

School and business closings scrolled on local television as if there were a snowstorm.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon urged people to remain peaceful as he appeared at a news conference with the state's public safety director and the leaders of St. Louis city and county.

"Our shared hope and expectation is that regardless of the decision, people on all sides show tolerance, mutual respect and restraint," Nixon said.

The governor said he did not know what the grand jury had decided.

Hours before the announcement, dozens of people gathered in the parking lot across the street from the Ferguson Police Department. Many stood right at the edge of the lot, almost in the street, chanting things "no justice, no peace, no racist police."

One woman leading the group screamed through a bullhorn "indict that cop. Police don't like it. We want an indictment."

Several young men in hooded sweatshirts that said "Peace Keepers" kept people from streaming into the street. A couple of people approached the police department building, but a woman asked them to protest the right way and pulled them into a prayer circle. Shortly after that, 15 uniformed officers came out to monitor the protests.

The grand jury has been considering charges against Darren Wilson, the white suburban St. Louis officer who fatally shot the black 18-year-old after a confrontation in August.

The Aug. 9 shooting inflamed tensions in the predominantly black St. Louis suburb that is patrolled by an overwhelmingly white police force. As Brown's body lay for hours in the center of a residential street, an angry crowd of onlookers gathered. Rioting and looting occurred the following night, and police responded with armored vehicles and tear gas.

Protests continued for weeks - often peacefully, but sometimes turning violent, with demonstrators throwing rocks and Molotov cocktails and police firing smoke canisters, tear gas and rubber bullets.

Nixon said the National Guard will provide security at "critical facilities," such as police and fire stations and utility substations, and would offer other support as needed.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said demonstrators would be given leeway to slow down traffic in the streets, but "we will not allow them to hurt anyone or damage anyone's property."

St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley urged people to "think with their head and not with their emotion."

Anticipating the potential for large demonstrations, more than 15 school districts canceled Monday evening activities and several extended their Thanksgiving break by canceling classes Tuesday. Washington University closed a satellite campus in Clayton.

Pastors were planning a rally and prayer service later Monday evening at the West Side Missionary Baptist Church in St. Louis.

"There's a lot of hurt, a lot of brokenness. There's anger and frustration on every side," said the Rev. Ronald Bobo Sr., the church's pastor. "We need the hand of God to lead us and guide us."

The 12-person grand jury met in secret for months, hearing evidence from a wide variety of witnesses as it weighed whether Wilson's should face charges that could range from involuntary manslaughter to murder. The grand jurors could also decide not to charge Wilson at all.

At the lower end of the possible charges is second-degree involuntary manslaughter, which is defined as acting with criminal negligence to cause a death. It is punishable by up to four years in prison. The most serious charge, first-degree murder, can be used only when someone knowingly causes a death after deliberation and is punishable by either life in prison or lethal injection.

(PHOTO: NBC News)

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3 months ago

Crowds gather for Michael Brown's funeral

Hundreds lined up at the Temple Missionary Baptist Church in St. Louis early Monday morning ahead of the service for Michael Brown.

Brown was killed in a controversial shooting by Fergusom, Missouri police on August 9th. He was unarmed at the time, and his death set off several nights of violent protests.

Michael Brown's parents have asked for a "day of silence" from protesters as they mourn their loss and say goodbye.

Read more: http://nbcnews.to/1p5Dlev

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3 months ago

New fear: What happens in Ferguson if no charges?

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) - Calm has come to Ferguson, Missouri, after nights of violent unrest over the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

But a crucial question lingers: What happens if the grand jury considering the case doesn't return a charge against the officer?

The fear among some local residents and officials is that such an outcome could stoke new anger and violence.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill told The Associated Press she's pushing for federal and local investigations to be completed around the same time so that all evidence can be made public. It's a step many consider important should prosecutors decide not to charge the officer.

Her office said Friday the Department of Justice hasn't given a timeline for the federal investigation of the Aug. 9 shooting.

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3 months ago

Ferguson: Violence ebbs, but anger remains

Heavy rains slowed the protests overnight in Ferguson, Missouri.

Crowds remained peaceful and only a few arrests were reported.

On Wednesday the cry for justice came outside a St. Louis courthouse, where a grand jury met for the first time to hear evidence in the shooting death of unarmed teenager Michael Brown.

Attorney General Eric Holder traveled to Ferguson on Wednesday to check in on the ongoing federal civil rights investigation that already includes more than 100 witness interviews and an independent autopsy.

"It doesn't mean that this thing should drag on. We will try to do this as expeditiously as we can. on the other hand at the end of the day it's most important that we get it right," Holder said.

Holder met privately with the Brown family after talking with members of the community, elected officials and Captain Ron Johnson, the Missouri State Highway Patrol officer charged with trying to keep the peace along the front lines of the protests.

Read more: http://nbcnews.to/1ljcmBn

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4 months ago

Holder calls for end to violence in Ferguson

WASHINGTON (AP) - Attorney General Eric Holder is promising a thorough investigation into the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown while calling for "an end to the acts of violence in the streets" of Ferguson, Missouri.

Holder says the Justice Department "will defend the right of protesters to peacefully demonstrate and for the media to cover a story that must be told." He is calling on the citizens of Ferguson "to join with law enforcement in condemning the actions of looters, vandals and others seeking to inflame tensions."

Holder is traveling to Ferguson on Wednesday to meet with FBI and other officials carrying out an independent federal investigation into Brown's death. His remarks appeared late Tuesday in an open letter published on the St. Louis Post-Dispatch website.

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4 months ago

Obama sending attorney general Holder to Missouri

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama is sending Attorney General Eric Holder to Ferguson, Missouri, to meet with federal law enforcement authorities investigating the police shooting of an unarmed teenager.

Obama says Holder will travel to the St. Louis suburb on Wednesday.

Holder recently authorized a federal autopsy on the body of Michael Brown, the unarmed 18-year-old who was fatally shot on Aug. 9. Brown was black; the officer who shot him was white.

Obama spoke from the White House on Monday after independent autopsy results determined that Brown was shot at least six times, including twice in the head. Missouri's governor also called in the National Guard early Monday after police again used tear gas to quell protests that have taken nightly since Brown's death.

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4 months ago

Missouri governor sends National Guard to Ferguson

FERGUSON, Mo. - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has ordered the National Guard to Ferguson to help restore order to the St. Louis suburb after a week of that has seen several violent protests over the fatal police shooting of an unarmed black teenager.

Nixon made the announcement in statement issued early Monday after another night of clashes between police and protesters in Ferguson.

Officers used tear gas to clear demonstrators off the streets late Sunday.

Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol is command in Ferguson. He says authorities were responding to reports of gunfire, looting, vandalism and protesters who hurled Molotov cocktails.

4 months ago

Gov declares emergency, imposes curfew in Ferguson

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency Saturday and imposed a curfew in a St. Louis suburb where police and protesters have clashed after a black teenager was shot to death by a white police officer a week ago.

Nixon said that though many protesters were making themselves heard peacefully, the state would not allow looters to endanger the community where 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot in a street. The curfew will run from midnight to 5 a.m. Sunday.

"I am committed to making sure the forces of peace and justice prevail," Nixon said at a chaotic press conference at a church that was interrupted repeatedly by people objecting to the curfew and demanding that the officer who shot Brown be charged with murder.

"We must first have and maintain peace. This is a test. The eyes of the world are watching," Nixon said. "We cannot allow the ill will of the few to undermine the good will of the many."

Nixon's curfew announcement came after tensions again flared in Ferguson late Friday night. Local police had earlier in the day identified the officer who shot Brown as Darren Wilson and released documents and video footage alleging that Brown had robbed a convenience store just before he was shot. Police said Wilson was unaware Brown was a suspect when he initially encountered him walking in the street with a friend.

Nixon said the U.S. Department of Justice is beefing up its civil rights investigation of the shooting.

Missouri State Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson, who is in charge of security in Ferguson, said 40 FBI agents were going door-to-door in the neighborhood starting Saturday, talking to people who might have seen or have information about the shooting.

Johnson assured those at the news conference that police would not enforce the curfew with armored trucks and tear gas but would communicate with protesters and give them ample opportunity to leave. Nixon and Johnson were flanked by numerous local elected officials, including U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay Jr., who urged Johnson to be flexible with the midnight curfew.

Among the many people shouting questions was Malik Shabazz, the president of Black Lawyers for Justice, who said that members of his group and the New Black Panther Party and the Nation of Islam had been helping to maintain order and deter protesters from violence.

"It seems to be a tight curfew line that could be a prescription for confrontation," said Shabazz, who asked unsuccessfully that the curfew's start be delayed by an hour.

Brown's death had already ignited several days of clashes with furious protesters. Tensions eased Thursday after Nixon turned oversight of the protests over to the Missouri Highway Patrol. Gone were the police in riot gear and armored vehicles, replaced by the new patrol commander who personally walked through the streets with demonstrators. But Friday night marked a resurgence of unrest.

Local officers faced strong criticism earlier in the week for their use of tear gas and rubber bullets against protesters. Johnson said one tear gas canister was deployed Friday night after the group of rioters became unruly and several officers got trapped and injured.

Wilson, the officer who shot Brown, is a six-year police veteran who had no previous complaints against him, the local police chief has said.

The Ferguson Police Department has refused to say anything about Wilson's whereabouts, and Associated Press reporters were unable to contact him at any addresses or phone numbers listed under that name in the St. Louis area.

Wilson has been on paid administrative leave since the shooting. St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch said it could be weeks before the investigation wraps up.

St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley asked Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster on Friday to take over the case, saying he did not believe McCulloch could be objective. Koster said Missouri law does not allow it unless McCulloch opts out, and McCulloch spokesman Ed Magee said the prosecutor has no plans to surrender the case.

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4 months ago

Ferguson: Calm night after highway patrol takever

For the first time this week Ferguson, Missouri was calm, but not quiet, overnight.

Hundreds of protesters still spilled out into the streets Thursday evening as police still stood guard, but this time it was a march, not the melee that played out over the four nights before.

"There is a different feel, there's not as much tension," said Pastor Michael Robinson. "I feel a great positive force that's in the air. There's a lot of hope."

For the first time since since Michael Brown, an unarmed teenager, was killed during a confrontation with local police, the gas masks and riot gear were gone and state troopers walked with angry residents in a show of unity.

Read more: http://nbcnews.to/1l8r666

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4 months ago

Ferguson: Brown was robbery suspect

Police released the name of the officer who shot and killed an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Missouri over the weekend.

Officer Darren Wilson shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown.

"He's been a police officer for six years. has had no disciplinary action taken against him. he was treated for injuries that occurred on Saturday," Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson said after identifying Wilson.

Jackson explained the shooting took place as Wilson was responding to a 911 call about a strong-arm robbery of a convenience store, and released surveillance photos of the robbery.

The chief says a description of the suspect was broadcast to patrol officers just before the the confrontation between Wilson and Brown.

Read more: http://nbcnews.to/1BkhMka

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4 months ago

Ferguson: New details released

Police have released the name of the officer who shot and killed unarmed teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri over the weekend, as well as surveillance video they say shows Brown stealing from a convenience store shortly before he was shot.

Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson also confirmed that Officer Darren Wilson did not know that Brown was suspect when he confronted him.

Asked why Brown and a friend were stopped, the chief said: "Because they were walking down the middle of the street blocking traffic."

The release of the video has angered many in the community, including Brown's parents.

A statement released by the family's attorney reads: "There is nothing based on the facts that have been placed before us that can justify the execution style murder of their child by this police officer."

Read more: http://nbcnews.to/1BkhMka

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